Grow Your Wiki

“The People Formerly Known as the Audience” and the Wiki

Jay Rosen of PressThink fame has received a statement from the people - “The People Formerly Known as the Audience” that is. The statement addresses the shift in power that technology has brought to the creation and consumption of information:

“The people formerly known as the audience are those who were on the receiving end of a media system that ran one way, in a broadcasting pattern, with high entry fees and a few firms competing to speak very loudly while the rest of the population listened in isolation from one another— and who today are not in a situation like that at all.

  • Once they were your printing presses; now that humble device, the blog, has given the press to us. That’s why blogs have been called little First Amendment machines. They extend freedom of the press to more actors.
  • Once it was your radio station, broadcasting on your frequency. Now that brilliant invention, podcasting, gives radio to us. And we have found more uses for it than you did.
  • Shooting, editing and distributing video once belonged to you, Big Media. Only you could afford to reach a TV audience built in your own image. Now video is coming into the user’s hands, and audience-building by former members of the audience is alive and well on the Web.
  • You were once (exclusively) the editors of the news, choosing what ran on the front page. Now we can edit the news, and our choices send items to our own front pages.
  • A highly centralized media system had connected people “up” to big social agencies and centers of power but not “across” to each other. Now the horizontal flow, citizen-to-citizen, is as real and consequential as the vertical one.”

I’d like to add one more to the list:

  • Encyclopedias were once the exclusive domain of experts whose names we never knew, and textbooks allowed us to contribute our ideas only to the margins of our own book. Now we have the Wiki, which enables us all to see and edit each others’ work, to aggregate our collective expertise, and to build strong, self-sustaining communities of mutual interest.

(I found Jay’s post via Stephen Downes - just wanted to give credit where it’s due. Stephen’s Web is an immesurably important source of information and thought leadership.)


Related Posts:

No Comments, Comment or Ping

Reply to ““The People Formerly Known as the Audience” and the Wiki”

About

Subscribe to RSS

Read Future Changes in other languages:  


Recent Comments
Consulting
Stewart Mader presenting at Northern Voice 2008 The key to successful wiki adoption is to create the conditions for steady growth. I'll help you plan your strategy, run a pilot, and build a hub for knowledge sharing, collaboration, and project management.

Profile and Biography | Hire Me
Books
Wikipatterns book: a practical guide to improving productivity and collaboration in your organization Wikipatterns
A practical guide to improving productivity and collaboration in your organization.
Buy the book
Using Wiki in Education wiki book Using Wiki in Education
10 case studies from education show how to collaboratively build curriculum, guide students' teamwork, and manage research projects.
Buy the book
Articles
Your Wiki Isn’t Wikipedia: How to Use It for Technical Communication Your Wiki Isn’t Wikipedia (PDF download)
How to use a wiki for technical communication and project management. Published in the January, 2009 issue of Intercom, the magazine of the Society for Technical Communication.
5 Effective Wiki Uses and How Companies Benefit From Them 5 Effective Wiki Uses (PDF download)
Five ways your business can benefit from using a wiki. Published in the August, 2008 issue of Website Magazine.
All Articles
Search

Popular Posts 21 Days of Wiki Adoption Blogroll